Tea Party Patriots

Boston Tea Party: Colonists dumped the British...
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We are a Homeschooling family. American History is our favorite subject, and we love going to the Taxpayers Tea Parties.

I’ll never forget the first Tea Party in Memphis.  My daughter and her four kids were there with me. We enjoyed being in the company of hundreds of American patriots. We felt like we were participating in American history. Which, of course, we were.

The kids were amazed by the passion of the speakers addressing the crowd in the open air. They liked answering the speakers saying,”We say no,” in unison with the crowd. We made a memory that day, and I hope they remember it all the days of their lives.

While we were driving home, I told the kids what I remembered about the American Revolution. I told them that Patrick Henry made a stirring speech in which he said “Give me liberty, or give me death.” And that speech was the spark that ignited the American Revolution. It must have been some speech.

So I found it and read it to the children. While I was reading it, I realized that I had never seen the entire speech before. some important things about it. I studied American History in college, but we only read the part where Patrick Henry proclaimed, “Give me liberty or give me death.”

It’s very likely that you have never read it either, and I’ll tell you why. Patrick Henry’s speech has been removed from our textbooks because he talks about God in it.  If  young and impressionable school children read this, they might be inspired to love God and to love America. That would defeat the purpose of modern education which is to indoctrinate our children with secularism, multi-culturism, and socialism.

The following lines are from Patrick Henry’s speech to the Virginia Assembly on March 23, 1775. They are just as true for Americans today as they were then. I believe that he was inspired by the Spirit of God to speak these words.

The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides sir, we shall not fight our battles alone.

There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilent, the active, the brave. . . .

Is life so dear; or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death.


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How Do We Know Who to Vote For?

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"Noah Webster, The Schoolmaster of the Re...

"Noah Webster, The Schoolmaster of the Republic," print by Root & Tinker. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Division of Prints and Photographs Online. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2003680822/?sid=ed9af5f8c1822c65772ea1b4185054d0 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I love reading quotes from the writings of godly people, because they are nuggets of wisdom and truth. I want to introduce you to Noah Webster, and to some of the things he said about the Bible and about selecting candidates for public office.

Noah Webster practically invented public education in America. His American Dictionary of the English Language, published in 1828, was our first dictionary. His “Blue-Backed Speller” was the most widely used textbook in America for a hundred years. He said “Education is useless without the Bible.” And he explained why this is true.

“The moral principles and precepts contained in the Scriptures ought to form the basis of all of our civil constitutions and laws. …All of the miseries and evils which men suffer from vice, crime, ambition, injustice, oppression, slavery and war, proceed from their despising or neglecting the precepts contained in the Bible.

Mr. Webster included this advice on voting to the young readers of his American History textbook. He told them who to vote for.

“In selecting men for public office, let principle be your guide. Regard not the particular sect or denomination of the candidate—look to his character. It is alleged by men of loose principles, or defective views of the subject, that religion and morality are not necessary or important qualifications for political stations. But the scriptures teach a different doctrine. They direct that rulers should be men who rule in the fear of God, men of truth, hating covetousness.

It is to the neglect of this rule that we must ascribe the multiplied frauds, breaches of trust, speculations and embezzlements of public property which astound even ourselves; which tarnish the character of our country and which disgrace our government.

When a citizen gives his vote to a man of known immorality, he abuses his civic responsibility; he not only sacrifices his own responsibility; he sacrifices not only his own interest, but those of his neighbor; he betrays the interest of his country.”

Mr. Webster’s advise makes perfect sense, but we have done just the opposite of what he said. We have been led to believe that religion has no place in politics, or in government; but that’s not true. Our Constitution and our government are based on principles of the Bible, and that’s why they work so well.

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